RU  UK  EN
Статьи  >  Imagine  >  Nihongami: Topknot as a aign of status

Nihongami: Topknot as a aign of status

Автор: 19.07.2019 | Japan, traditions
Nihongami is a certain way to arrange hair in Japanese tradition. Interestingly, in the Land of the Rising Sun hairdos were legally controlled and served as some sort of dress code for ladies of different social statuses and classes. Therefore, each class had strictly determined corresponding outfit and hairstyle and those laws are still obeyed by geishas and their apprentices.

Nihongami translates from the source language as Japanese hair. In the broadest sense, this notion includes all national hairdos in Japan, both male and female. However, the term most frequently means hairdos of female part after all, the ones that originated in the country in Azuchi-Momoyama period (1568 - 1603) and concluded formation in Edo era (1603 - 1868).Photo animacity.ru

The Japanese cherish their culture reverently therefore among other things they respect traditions, and for some representatives of the nation they are still an essential law. Nihongami is worn by maikos (apprentice geisha), geishas, performers of folk dances as well as kabuki theatre actors.

Besides, local citizens even came up with a festival for their traditional hairdos – annual “Comb Festival” (Kushi Matsuri). In late September in Kyoto recognized artisans recreate colorful hair ornamentation in strict compliance with historic traditions.Photo flickr.com

Baseline for any Japanese hairdo is a double-folded queue (chonmage). Even samurai and sumo wrestlers arrange their hair this way. Main difference of male version from female is in whimsical and ornate decoration. At that numerous variety of versions of this adornment traditionally exist thus dividing nihongami into types by social class of a person wearing it. In this respect, every trifle matters.

Read also: Kintsugi. Japanese art of restoration

Main indicator of a status is location of a topknot. In may be arranged high on the back of the head or lower, close to neck. Now, high one is Japanese symbol for sophistication. It befits ladies of samurai social strata or other representatives of high position in own sphere.Photo tvoilokony.ru

Mage is the way bun shape is called in Japanese tradition. All hairdos are differentiated based on nature of mage. One of the most widely spread is shimada mage. In order to make it, hair is pulled together, turned upwards and ends are bend inside – the composition resembles an eight from the side. In its central part it is affixed with lacing, thread or a piece of fabric.

Read also: The ghost brush of miss Hokusai

Based on pompous version of this topknot with white lacing, hairdo for women, for instance, from samurai social strata is created. Important thing is that all in all hairdo turns out airy and is tied with accessories very loosely. This elegant set is also worn by modern geishas. In ancient times nihongami of this kind was chosen by “girls from mansions”. Such a respectful term was used to refer to servants who worked in homes of samurais thus making them equal to the level that in European tradition, for instance, is called “office employees”.1 (1).jpgPhoto insidejapantours.com

Hairdo with a topknot that is tightly tied in the middle so that a curve gets shaped is called tsubushi shimada meaning “destroyed pyramid”. Ends of locks that stick out from top downward get wider to make for what resembles a bow. This version is considered very sweet, flirtatious and playful among the Japanese. Such a set can be located both on the top of the head and in low position. Adornments are more important here, they are affixed to a central part of the topknot. This can be a ribbon of silk or polka-dotted fabric, tied around with silver-colored or gold-colored string to create volume of the hairdo. It is worth mentioning that such adornment (it is called kanoko) caught so much fancy among Japanese women that with time tsubushi shimada became the most hairstyle popular among young citizens.

Read also: Superflat: Concept of contemporary Japanese art

Marumage is a topknot that is not affixed in any way so it visually resembles a loop. It allows different options as to location of hair higher or lower, extended or flattened side locks etc. In Japanese tradition it is considered a typical hairdo for married women.

In Japanese society clear social class differentiation exists, it is emphasized by all means, including general appearance. It needs to be mentioned that such differentiation works even among “women of easy virtue”. For instance, the word oiran is used to refer to courtesan of the highest class and their traditional hairdo is date-hyougo (also known as tate-hyougo) that resembles wings of a butterfly or ears of a rabbit. To create it tail is gathered high on top, locks are divided vertically and then are pulled to the sides. Importantly, there is no way such hairdos befit ordinary women.3.jpgPhoto 4.bp.blogspot.com

Decorate hair with different colors and fluffy hair clips rely only on the youngest girls. They are made of soft materials - ribbons, beautiful yarns, brushes, silk fabrics, floral hairpins, etc.

Hair accessories for elder women, on the other hand, are made of expensive materials – silver, ivory, corals or turtle shell. Adornments made of the latter one are distinct for especially skyrocketing prices, so it makes sense that they serve as an indicator of upper crust women. For instance, an ordinary hairpin made of it currently costs about 50 thousand yen (about 480 Dollars).

Cover photo hisgo.com

Вам это будет интересно:
This is a real service! Japanese taxi
The first thing every tourist shall learn in a country is a transport system. Very often it seems to be complicated and confusing, and it takes weeks or even months to make head or tail of it. OUTLOOK reader Natalia Usenko visited Japan and is sharing her impressions about the most comfortable and safest transport in the world.
Desperate Futurism: Japan. Part 3. “Samurai Spirit”
If what they show in cinematograph is true than a typical samurai appears to be austere, taciturn and even slightly unsociable person. But this image in actual fact doesn’t get in line with reality... You don’t believe it? Our journalist Elena Rasenko suggests you make sure of it for yourself.
Mandala Therapy
Yesterday I created a Universe. I took some peas, rice, buckwheat, millet, black and white pepper seeds and cardamom. Grabbed a handful of coffee and aniseeds. Then it all acquired a centre. It kept growing and calming my thoughts. When the last seed landed in the circle, I felt forgotten harmony again, heard birds singing through the noise of cars on the avenue...
Rice fields: Grains of unbelievable beauty
- Do you want to try some rice? - such a question is greeted by guests in China. And if the owners are also farmers, they can invite you on an unusual excursion and show you the masterpiece of natural art. The grass which we often eat without thinking about its aesthetics, at the time of growing resembles a blanket woven from multi-colored rags ...
Desperate Futurism: Japan. Part 2 “Fish Day”
It is just as hard to imagine a Japanese who doesn’t eat fish as to picture a Scott who doesn’t drink whiskey. OUTLOOK journalist Elena Rasenko will tell you about a unique place where successors of samurai purchase fine seafood for their tables.
Desperate Futurism: Japan. Part 1
OUTLOOK journalist Elena Rasenko came back from Japan and launches a special series of articles devoted to this country. Warning for very sensitive readers: Beware! After reading, you will get a keen desire to break away, buy a ticket and fly to such a marvelous and fascinating Land of the Rising Sun!
Thailand handcraft: From silk to pearls
Have you ever thought how many grains of history are stored in each item sold at little booths in Thailand? Yet, strolling along those souvenir stalls you are browsing craft records of the whole nation, briefly looking through notes survived from a thousand years ago to the present day. Some pages have thinned to transparency, but marks did preserve their former accuracy.
Ecuador: To be an indian
Our journalist came back from Ecuador with unique experience and we share it with you. For the first time I was suspected of drug trafficking. Alone, in the country where there is no Ukrainian Embassy, I was standing and feverishly figuring out if someone could plant something on me on the way to the airport.
Lost island of Yap. The land of big money
How can you understand the nature of finance, if there is no desire to go deep into the jungle of science? It is better to see once, than to read a hundred times: a trip to the island of Yap in Micronesia replaces the entire university course of monetary theory. Yap roads are lined up with giant doughnut-shaped, carved disks the size of a millstone - rampant inflation has made the world biggest money into fun for tourists.
Road to Asia is paved with carpets
Carpets hang on walls as a symbol of wealth, lay on floors to create coziness and are presented as expensive gifts. Studying fancy pictures in the shapes of diamonds and stars on them attempting to figure out their meaning is a fairly amusing thing to do. Globally spread carpeting traditions were borrowed from eastern peoples who were the first to learn how to make yarn and fabric out of fibrous materials.
Women's adornments in India: Sacred meaning
Upon hearing word combination “Hindu woman” an image of a beautiful woman wearing sari and definitely with numerous adornments and pictures on her body emerges in our imagination. Where does passion for body decoration come from in national traditions of this people?
Your breakfast, Sir! How people start their day around the world
A mini toast, a slice of cheese and a sip of strong coffee. "That is not a buffet!" a waiter will pronounce indignantly, looking at the disgruntled tourist’s face. The generous Ukrainian soul cannot understand how locals manage to eat their full with that. Therefore, before going to a new country, you need to know exactly whether in the evening you should prepare a couple of sandwiches to indulge them in the morning,...
"Goat-dragging"
“To drag a goat with one’s hands” is a national entertainment of Tajik men however it enjoys huge popularity around Central Asia in the whole. As a rule a couple dozens, sometimes as many as a hundred, skilled and nimble horse riders gather to drag the goat. There is such a throng during the event that people fall off their horses, lose consciousness and even get maimed.
World most beautiful lighthouses
Lighthouse - this word evokes beautiful associations: sea adventures, storms, huge ships. And we do not want to dispel these thoughts, but rather to add fuel to the fire. There is a great amount of them in the world, they are striking by their beauty and inimitable. Today we are sharing with you the quintet of amazing lighthouses!
Wedding traditions of the world: from geese to lasso
Stealing the bride's shoe in the midst of the celebration, and to require unimaginable redemption from the groom, is an interesting action for which it is worth to go to the wedding party. This is not the only wedding tradition of country, by which the legal wedlock of two hearts acquires a special flavour. What are interesting rituals of different parts of our planet?
Tasty Japan: Give the country a try
Ice cream with a taste of horse meat, pickled insects, fish with deadly venom, etc – Japanese cuisine has things to surprise, amaze and shock you with. And truth be told, enumeration of these dishes doesn’t help my appetite at all. But we are not after exotic stuff. True culinary tourism is an attempt to comprehend mindset and feel national distinctive color through traditional cuisine – not try most exotic dishes.
Mechoui: Heavy Treat
Destiny often hatches surprises and you can never know for sure what you’ll try at a festive table especially when travelling around Middle East countries.
Happiness moves in mysterious way: Places to make wishes in Latvia
Trip to Latvia breaks the chain of mundanity, awakes secret fantasies which usually remain dormant in the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Wandering between the centuries-old pine trees, fresh Baltic breeze languidly runs over strings in wait for off-beat adventure. Dreams do come true – you just need to know a right place to make a wish.
Video: Craft of Uzbekistan. Golden-stitched embroidery
OUTLOOK was lucky to visit hospitable Uzbekistan and get better acquainted with crafts of this amazing country. Today we'll tell you about art of golden-stitched embroidery that has long been considered the art of the nobility. We will tell you about mediums artisans use, secrets and unique distinctives of this craft. Feel the world with us!
Kagoshima: City with kamikaze fame
Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius!, Nietzsche exclaimed in a prophetic ecstasy. Gloomy pathos of the philosopher could be hardly understood by the residents of the Japanese city of Kagoshima, located at the bottom of the caldera Aira resulting from the explosion about 22 thousand years ago. Farmers were hoeing edges of the hollow from the Bronze Age, as usual fending off the ashes scattered in the air.
Закрыть
Outlook facebook page